What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course


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PHIL* Philosophy of Science | Undergraduate Calendar | University of Guelph

Possible topics include freedom, determinism, and responsibility; moral luck; responsibility and reactive attitudes such as blame and forgiveness; responsibility and situationism; moral and criminal responsibility; responsibility and excuse; insanity and psychopathy, immaturity, addiction, provocation, and duress. Social justice issues as they arise across the borders of nation-states. Topics may include nationalism and cosmopolitanism, theories of just war and just warfare, issues of migration and immigration, global distributive justice and fair trade, and international cooperation in the face of global problems such as climate change and human rights violations.

Investigation into the nature of free will, including arguments for and against its compatibility with a scientific picture of the world and competing accounts of the metaphysics of free will. Possible topics include disputes about the nature of free will; what it is for agents to cause actions; the nature of abilities or capacities to act; the relevance of neuroscience to accounts of free will; whether free will skepticism is a stable view; and experimental research on free will.

Central problems in philosophy of science, such as the nature of confirmation and explanation, the nature of scientific revolutions and progress, the unity of science, and realism and antirealism. Philosophical problems in the biological sciences, such as the relation between biology and the physical sciences, the status and structure of evolutionary theory, and the role of biology in the social sciences.

Chemical Vineyard

Investigation of ethical and epistemological questions concerning our relationship to the environment. Topics may include the value of nature, biodiversity, policy and science, and responsibility to future generations. Philosophical issues raised by psychology, including the nature of psychological explanation, the role of nature versus nurture, free will and determinism, and the unity of the person. Theoretical, empirical, methodological, and philosophical issues at work in the cognitive sciences e.

An introduction to elementary neuroanatomy and neurophysiology and an examination of theoretical issues in cognitive neuroscience and their implications for traditional philosophical conceptions of the relation between mind and body, perception, consciousness, understanding, emotion, and the self. Philosophical issues of method and substance in the social sciences, such as causal and interpretive models of explanation, structuralism and methodological individualism, value neutrality, and relativism.

The Scientific Revolution: Crash Course History of Science #12

Topics may include historical movements, such as scholasticism, positivism, Mexican existentialism, and indigenous thought, as well as contemporary developments and the relationship to philosophy in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere. Central issues and texts in the history of ethics. Subject matter can vary, ranging from one philosopher e. An examination of contemporary moral issues, such as abortion, euthanasia, war, affirmative action, and freedom of speech.

Philosophical issues involved in the development of modern science, the growth of technology, and control of the natural environment. The interaction of science and technology with human nature and political and moral ideals. Examination of freedom and equality under the US Constitution, focusing on Supreme Court cases concerning discrimination on grounds of race, ethnic background, gender, undocumented status, wealth, and sexual orientation, and cases regarding contraceptives, abortion, interracial marriage, polygamy, and same-sex marriage.

Central issues about the justification, proper functions, and limits of the state through classic texts in the history of political philosophy by figures such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Arendt. Different perspectives on central issues in contemporary political philosophy, such as the nature of state authority and political obligation, the limits of government and individual liberty, liberalism and its critics, equality and distributive justice.

A study of issues in analytical jurisprudence such as the nature of law, the relation between law and morality, and the nature of legal interpretation and issues in normative jurisprudence such as the justification of punishment, paternalism and privacy, freedom of expression, and affirmative action. Philosophical examination of core concepts and theses in feminism, feminist philosophy, and critiques of traditional philosophical approaches to morality, politics, and science, from a feminist perspective. May also treat the historical development of feminist philosophy and its critiques.

May be taken for credit two times with permission of instructor. A philosophical investigation of the topics of race and racism. The ethics of racial discourse. Anthropological and biological conceptions of race. The social and political significance of racial categories. Post-racialist conceptions of race. An in-depth exploration of an issue in bioethics.

Topics will vary, and may include the ethics of genetic engineering, mental capacity and genuinely informed consent, the just distribution of health care, the ethics of geo-engineering, and the ethics of climate change and health. May be taken for credit two times. A survey of ethical issues arising in the collection, storage, analysis, consolidation, and application of data.

What is this thing called science? (Michela Massimi and Duncan Pritchard)

Topics may include data as property and public resource, privacy and surveillance, data and discrimination, algorithms and fairness, and data regulation. Central issues in philosophical aesthetics such as the nature of art and aesthetic experience, the grounds of artistic interpretation and evaluation, artistic representation, and the role of the arts in education, culture, and politics.

A study of philosophical themes contained in selected fiction, drama, or poetry, and the philosophical issues that arise in the interpretation, appreciation, and criticism of literature. Careful, line-by-line translation of passages of intermediate difficulty from German philosophical texts, both classic Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Schopenhauer and contemporary Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Habermas. May be taken for credit six times as topics vary. LIGM 1D or equivalent level of study recommended.

Prerequisites: consent of instructor and preauthorization. Continuation of PHIL in the careful, line-by-line translation of passages of advanced difficulty from German philosophical texts, both classic Kant, Fichte, Hegel, Schopenhauer and contemporary Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Habermas. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. Prerequisites: consent of instructor or completion of PHIL Classical texts and issues of existentialism. The focus will be on a leading movement in continental philosophy e.

Among the issues to be discussed are the existence and nature of God, the problem of evil, the existence of miracles, the relation between reason and revelation, and the nature of religious language. Independent study by special arrangement with and under the supervision of a faculty member, including a proposal for the honors essay. An IP grade will be awarded at the end of this quarter; a final grade will be given for both quarters at the end of B. Prerequisites: department stamp; consent of instructor.

Philosophy of Science in Latin America

Continuation of A: independent study by special arrangement with and under the supervision of a faculty member, leading to the completion of the honors essay. A letter grade for both A and B will be given at the end of this quarter. Prerequisites: consent of instructor. Under the supervision of the instructor, student will lead one discussion section of a lower-division philosophy class. The student must attend the lecture for the class and meet regularly with the instructor.

Applications are available in the Department of Philosophy. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and department chair, GPA of 3. Directed individual study by special arrangement with and under the supervision of a faculty member. Introduction to philosophical methods of analysis through study of classic historical or contemporary texts. Writing intensive. Enrollment limited to philosophy entering graduate students. A study of selected texts or topics in the history of philosophy. Usually the focus will be on a single major text. May be taken for credit nine times with changed content.

An introduction to some central issues in ethical theory with emphasis on classic texts or contemporary authors. May be taken for credit three times with changed content.

An introduction to one or more central problems in the philosophy of science, or in the philosophy of one of the particular sciences, such as the nature of confirmation and explanation, the nature of scientific knowledge, reductionism, the unity of science, or realism and antirealism. An introduction to central topics in metaphysics with emphasis on classic texts or contemporary authors. An introduction to central topics in epistemology with emphasis on classic texts or contemporary authors.

An introduction to central topics in philosophy of mind with emphasis on classic texts or contemporary authors. Prerequisites: graduate standing or consent of instructor. An introduction to central topics in philosophy of language with emphasis on classic texts or contemporary authors. Prerequisites: graduate status or consent of instructor. Study and discussion of classic work in history of science, philosophy of science, and of work that attempts to develop a unified science studies approach.


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Required of all students in the Science Studies Program. Study and discussion of selected topics in the science studies field. The topic varies from year to year and students may, therefore, repeat the course for credit.

PHIL 2261 - Introduction to Philosophy of Science

A forum for the presentation and discussion of research in progress in science studies, by graduate students, faculty, and visitors. May be taken for credit two times with changed content.

Contemporary themes and problems in science studies. Focus on recent literature in the history, philosophy, and sociology of science, technology, and medicine. A study of selected texts or topics from the history of Greek philosophy. Usually centers on works by Plato or Aristotle. May be taken for credit six times with changed content. A study of selected texts or topics from philosophers of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, or Locke. A study of selected texts or topics from philosophers of the eighteenth century: for example, Kant or Hume.

A study of the historical development of the analytical movement, with emphasis on major texts. Topics may include identity, personal identity, universals and particulars, modality and possible worlds, causation, reduction, supervenience, freedom and determinism, space and time, and realism versus antirealism. This seminar will cover issues such as rival accounts of knowledge, justification, and warrant, traditional and contemporary perspectives on empiricism, rationalism, and pragmatism, and skepticism.

Contemporary debates on the nature, function, and operation of the mental. May include questions about the mind-body relation, mental causation, perception, consciousness, and mental representation. This seminar will cover current books and theoretical issues in the philosophy of science. May be taken for credit seven times with changed content.

What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course
What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course
What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course
What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course
What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course
What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course
What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course
What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course
What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course What is Scientific Methodology phil. sci. course

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